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1810 Goundie House

View the 1810 Goundie House that is believed to be the first brick residence in Bethlehem and the first private home to reflect the new architectural American Federal style.

ABOUT THE GOUNDIE HOUSE

The 1810 Goundie House, built by Moravian town brewer and businessman John Sebastian Goundie, is believed to be the first brick residence in Bethlehem and the first private home to reflect the new architectural American Federal style rather than the German Colonial style. Today, the Goundie House is a contributing property to the Historic Moravian Bethlehem National Historic Landmark District.

A distinctive feature of the home is the beehive baking oven connected to the kitchen fireplace on the first floor that does not extend on the exterior of the building.

The house was saved from demolition in the 1960s by Mrs. Sims and Mrs. Martin who sat on the stoop to stop the wrecking ball. It has been restored to its 1810 appearance both on the exterior and interior.

In 1832, Mr. Goundie built a connecting structure to his home as a dry goods store managed by his daughter and son-in-law, John Schropp. In 1852, Goundie sold the property to Louis Beckel, who enlarged the building adding a third floor and decorative elements in the 1880s.

In the mid 2000s, when Historic Bethlehem Museums & Sites restored the façade and made interior renovations to the Schropp Shop, the original doorway between the Goundie House and the store was discovered and opened to allow visitors to walk between the spaces. In addition, the 1870s pressed tin ceiling was uncovered and restored.

In 2011, the garden was restored as a charming green space in the middle of the downtown. 

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